907.529.2391 | mary@barbergp.com

Facebook’s Changes Leave Users with Decisions to Make

Recent, and upcoming, changes to Facebook have been the subject of much conversation this week. It’s leaving many reeling. I’ve been discussing how confusing it is for with several colleagues. We realized that if we’re confused and we work with social media daily, the casual user must be overwhelmed.

Facebook logoI don’t pretend to have the answers. How you manage your Facebook settings really depends on you — how much of your life you want to keep private and how much you want to keep close to your chest. Thank goodness the social community is happy to share their thoughts on this subject.

This post is a compilation of other posts I believe have information that will help you decide what to do. Spend some time this weekend reading them and deciding what works for you and your own situation. I hope this helps, and that you’ll share other articles that helped you, as well as concerns you have. Together, we’ll make this work for everyone.

Facebook is tracking your web surfing even when you’re logged out

Yes, it’s true that Facebook puts a cookie on your browser that allows them to know where you’re going on the Internet even when you leave their site. They have a very “sticky” cookie but Bhupesh Shah shared how to make sure they aren’t doing this anymore. And…make sure sticky cookies are gone as well: When using Firefox as your browser, CTRL-SHIFT-DEL clears all cookies. For maximum control, change your privacy to mimic those in this picture: http://twitpic.com/6sgd6v.

Note that if you do this, as I did, when you quit Firefox, all your open windows will close and you will need to log back into all your pages requiring log-ins.  So, make sure you’ve kept track of your passwords before hitting that quit button or only use Firefox for Facebook and a different browser for all other web work.

New Sharing Means Friends of those you Tag can Access your Page

Until this change, it seemed you could lock down your privacy settings fairly tightly and make sure people couldn’t access your page. Not has this changed, but it also you’ll have to keep checking your settings, especially after getting the new Timeline on your page.  Some reading on this subject:

Fixing Your Facebook Timeline Privacy

The New Facebook: How to Take Control of Your Privacy

Facebook’s New Features Might Not Be as Private as You Think.

What About the News Ticker? Smart Lists? Subscribe and Timeline?

The latest revision of Facebook’s layout brought a multitude of changes. The news ticker and smart lists are just two of the new “features.” Personally I’ve been using lists for some time to make sure it’s easier to see everyone’s posts. So, I just reactivated that process and was there. But the smart lists also allow you to get lists going pretty quickly. Social Media Examiner, a great source for knowledge about social media, provides a succinct post about these items that you should read.

And then there’s the Timeline…

Most of my friends who’ve converted to the new Timeline early love it. In fact, I haven’t heard from any with regrets. Like all changes it’s important to understand the new timeline will do and how you might want to amend your Facebook history ahead of the October 4 conversion:

Facebook Users Beware: Facebook’s New Feature Could Embarrass You

Fixing Your Facebook Timeline Privacy

YouTube Videos Show How to Lock Down

And last, for now anyway, but far from least the wonderful Tinu Abayomi-Paul offers these nine brief YouTube videos that show you how to change settings to increase your privacy.

So, how are you changing your Facebook settings and habits in light of the “refinements”? What other advice do you have for folks trying to sort through it all?

 

By | 2018-03-18T22:52:43+00:00 September 30th, 2011|Social Media|0 Comments

About the Author:

Mary Deming Barber, APR, Fellow PRSA, runs a strategic communications consultancy where she helps clients understand how to integrate new media into traditional communication programs. Mary has counseled clients in Tacoma, Anchorage, San Francisco, Oregon, and Colorado for nearly 40 years working with a variety of food organizations, several agencies, and as a key team member on two successful US Senate campaigns. 


Leave A Comment