This morning’s Solo PR chat started with a robust discussion about blogging; whether or not to make your blog your home page. This quickly changed to a much broader discussion about blogging in general. The typical answer to questions like this is…it depends.

As with all aspects of public relations or strategic communication, a good plan is the best way to begin. Some questions to consider:

  • Why do you want to blog?
  • What do you hope to accomplish?
  • Who is your audience?
  • What do you want to talk about?
    • What are you known for?
    • What do you want to be known for?
  • Is anyone else already blogging in this space?
    • If so, how will your blog be different?

Once you decide to blog, and what to blog about, consider the time commitment. Begin with the assumption you can write, edit and post in 90 minutes to 2 hours. If that’s the case, block out time on your calendar to write your posts.

Based on the general topics you’ve defined through the planning process, outline some posts for at least the first three months. This should give you a base from which to build some consistency.One Size Doesn't Fit All

Several participants on this morning’s chat shared my issue with confidence. Do people really want to read what I write? For some reason, the public nature of blogging raises confidence issues for many of us who regularly write for others. One way to overcome that is to have a trusted colleague who’s in the target audience take a quick look at your posts before they go live. It often helps strengthen a post.

Once you’ve decided to blog and determined your topics, look at your website and see where the blog should live. That’s actually what started the discussion on the chat…whether your blog should be your home page or not. Again, look at what you’re trying to do and why. Should you even attach your blog to your business site? For some, the blog is their business site.

Chances are, as long as you’ve thought it through, whatever you decide will work. It’s just like many aspects of strategic communications:

One size doesn’t fit all.